REPORT ON THE 2004 FIELDWORK SEASON OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY AT THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE OF EL-HIBEH, BENI-SUEF GOVERNORATE

By Carol A. Redmount, Project Director 

 

Jon Frey, the Hibeh Projectís GPS mapping specialist, continued his GPS mapping work on the tell mound itself and in some of the surrounding desert (Figure 2). He was forced to  remap some areas, such as the square enclosure in the desert, because the relevant data had been lost due to computer problems. Jon continued to fill in contour detail on the tell mound itself, as well as extend his work into the desert surrounding the site where the cemeteries are located.

 We also continued our surface survey reconnaissance activities, studying the surface formations and visible deposits of the tell and nearby burial areas, collecting surface material culture when and as appropriate (especially pottery), and monitoring overall site conditions. Of particular concern are the development of several sink holes on the tell and the continued intractable problem of the variable and destructive high water table, caused by agricultural irrigation, in the Sheshonq I limestone temple and temenos area. None of the sinkholes are yet large or destructive enough to warrant excavation interventions, but we are monitoring their development. The Sheshonq I temple lies in what is currently the lowest topographic location on the tell mound (Figure 3). Once again the soil in the back areas of the temple, both in the interior and the exterior of the edifice, was dark and damp, and the vegetation had grown back inside the structure and continued its spread over the area of the mudbrick temenos wall lying immediately in back of the limestone temple structure.

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